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Articles written by John M Taylor


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  • Robert E. Lee: An Exemplary American

    John M Taylor|Feb 1, 2024

    The assaults on Robert E. Lee and anyone who fought for Southern Independence never abate. Lee symbolizes most things his critics hate – he was a devout Christian, he believed in the sovereignty of the States within a voluntary federal republic, his primary allegiance was to Virginia (his “country”), and he felt “Union” at the point of a bayonet undermined the entire American experiment in self-government. One might ask: Why did the colonies seek independence if the goal was replicatio...

  • Robert E. Lee: An Exemplary American

    John M Taylor|Jan 1, 2024

    The assaults on Robert E. Lee and anyone who fought for Southern Independence never abate. Lee symbolizes most things his critics hate – he was a devout Christian, he believed in the sovereignty of the States within a voluntary federal republic, his primary allegiance was to Virginia (his “country”), and he felt “Union” at the point of a bayonet undermined the entire American experiment in self-government. One might ask: Why did the colonies seek independence if the goal was replicatio...

  • Mill, Dickens and Southern Independence

    John M Taylor|Dec 1, 2023

    T he War for Southern Independence impacte d events worldwide. In Great Britain debates raged as to why their “American Co usins” w ere i n conflict. Two renowned Englishmen – John Stuart Mill and Charles Dickens -- sparred over this very matter. This was not their first disagreement. John Stuart Mill was a poli tica l eco nomi st, politic ian, and p hilosopher who endorsed utilitarianism, a theory that advocated maximizati on of h ap pin ess and well -being. He supp orted fre e speec h,...

  • That Devilish Battle Hymn

    John M Taylor|Nov 1, 2023

    Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn stated: “To destroy a people, you must first sever their roots.” An example of Southerner’s historical ignorance is manifested in The Battle Hymn of the Republic, written by Unitarian “minister” Julia Ward Howe. Julia Ward was born in New York City in 1819 but spent much of her youth in Boston, Massachusetts. She was related to the affluent Astors of New York and her brother, Sam Ward, was a Wall Street financier (sometimes called “War Street” due to the...

  • Confederate Indians

    John M Taylor|Oct 1, 2023

    Recently, the Native American Guardians Association (NAGA) lobbied the Washington Commanders football team to bring back the Redskins name. Billy Dieckman, Kiowa Tribe member and NAGA adviser, described Redskins as “a status symbol for elite warriors.” (Fox News) A poll was cited showing 90% of American Indians see it as a positive term. It is also likely that some American Indians do not appreciate being canceled, such as the way Land O Lakes terminated the “Mia” image (some Indians...

  • The New England slave trade

    John M Taylor|Sep 1, 2023
    1

    The enemies of the South are all around. One of the most repugnant is Elizabeth “The Fake Indian” Warren. You also have Lloyd “The Wokester” Austin, who seems to have periodic battles with the English language; Mark “The Mannequin” Milley, who appears to have had brain surgery that went awry; and a gang of so-called historians who worship at the foot of Abe Lincoln and blame America’s “ills” on the South. As the Brits would say: bollocks! The political football that leftists...

  • Nathan Bedford Forrest Revisited

    John M Taylor|Aug 1, 2023

    In the October 2022 Alabama Gazette I covered part of the legacy of Nathan Bedford Forrest (https://www.alabamagazette.com/story/2022/10/01/opinion/the-false-demonization-of-nathan-bedford-forrest/2434.html). If anyone has been a victim of “the winners write the history,” it is Forrest. From his humble Tennessee roots, Forrest was the quintessential self-made man, a masterful military leader, and the antithesis of most of his critics. After his father died, sixteen-year-old Forrest became...

  • Moonbat Mendacity

    John M Taylor|Jul 1, 2023

    Following the suggestion of a fellow Alabama Gazette columnist, I read through “Let’s celebrate the real history of Jefferson Davis”, by Josh Moon. No surprise—it is just more “Righteous Cause” blather. The sub-title claims the South fought to “protect” slavery, yet the institution was constitutionally legal and Abe Lincoln and the Republicans stated ad nauseum that they had no intention or authority to interfere with slavery where it existed. A central reason for Republican...

  • Northerners Opposed to Coercion

    John M Taylor|Jun 1, 2023

    Jefferson Davis not only received verbal criticism, he was also subjected to physical abuse when he was held in a Union prison awaiting a trial that never happened; however, he never backed down from his belief in the sovereignty of the States. In 1846, Davis described the only source of the Federal Government’s powers: “I answer, it is the creature of the States; as such it could have no inherent power, all it possesses was delegated by the States.” Many Northerners agreed that the Union...

  • Lincoln, Republicans, and Corporate Welfare

    John M Taylor|May 1, 2023

    “I supported President Lincoln. I believed his war policy would be the only way to save the country, but I see my mistake. I visited Washington a few weeks ago, and I saw the corruption of the present administration—and so long as Abraham Lincoln and his Cabinet are in power, so long will war continue. And for what? For the preservation of the Constitution and the Union? No, but for the sake of politicians and government contractors.” J.P. Morgan—American financier and banker, 1864. Many...

  • Coercion: Union by Force

    John M Taylor|Apr 1, 2023

    Marjorie Taylor Greene’s recent “national divorce” comments angered nationalists, globalists, and others who view these United States as an “unbreakable union.” How could such authoritarian thinking evolve from a country that was founded on individualism, voluntary self-government, and belief in God? At least part of this agenda can be traced to the Southern States being militarily forced back into a Union they democratically voted to leave. Abe Lincoln rebuffed multiple compromise eff...

  • The Corwin Amendment (The Original Thirteenth Amendment)

    John M Taylor|Mar 1, 2023

    From the mid-1900s to modern times, the government-approved narrative has been that the South fought a war to protect slavery. This was denied by Southerners, e.g., Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Richard Taylor, E. P. Alexander, Raphael Semmes, and Northerners, e.g., George Lunt, Simon Cameron, Edward Channing, and for at least the first half of the war, U.S. Grant and Abraham Lincoln. Slavery in America had never been more secure than on the eve of the war. Congress’ July 23, 1861,...

  • Black Confederates: Myth or Reality?

    John M Taylor|Feb 1, 2023

    In November 2022, The University of Dayton student newspaper ran an article about Al Arnold and his 2015 book, Robert E. Lee’s Orderly: A Modern Black Man’s Confederate Journey. Arnold, a devout Christian descended from a Black Confederate Veteran, has likely relied on his faith to shield himself from the backlash caused by deviating from the “government-approved narrative.” In reality, Black loyalty to the South was critical, as they ran or helped run small and large farms and...

  • Robert E. Lee, Arlington, and the Ministry of Truth

    John M Taylor|Jan 1, 2023

    It is difficult to monitor the level of awareness of the effort to destroy the Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. Moses Ezekiel, a Jewish Confederate Veteran, who created this work of art, is buried below the monument along with three other veterans. This hate-filled and apparently anti-Semitic agenda, pushed by Ty Seidule, is not unique in American history. The story of Arlington Cemetery reveals another unsavory episode—one involving Robert E. Lee, George Washington, and...

  • The Southern Side of Alabama's History

    John M Taylor|Dec 1, 2022

    The State of Alabama is filled with interesting history. At least two schools of thought exist about the name’s origin. One contends it is derived from Alabamas or Alibamons, a tribe in the Creek Indian Confederacy. The other claims it is the combination of two Choctaw words (Alba and Amo), generally thought to mean “vegetation gatherers.” Either way, the name has American Indian roots. The mild climate, fertile soil, and abundance of water, create an indelible link to agriculture. Those...

  • The Gettysburg Address: Lincolnian Sophistry

    John M Taylor|Nov 1, 2022

    Being born in the middle of the Baby Boom, I have seen society improve in some ways and deteriorate in others. Declines in education are well documented. Although a large percentage of teachers seek to properly educate students, some have political agendas contrary to that of the traditional Christian South. Thinking back, it is clear parts of this agenda were under way during my youth, i.e., we were taught mostly “Yankee history.” (Post-war, Brown University President Dr. Francis Wayland...

  • The False Demonization of Nathan Bedford Forrest

    John M Taylor|Oct 1, 2022

    Just mentioning the name Nathan Bedford Forrest stirs many emotions. As Abe Lincoln has been falsely deified, Forrest has been falsely demonized. Remember, the winner writes the history and they have done a massive disservice to the legacy of Forrest. Nathan Bedford Forrest was born in Chapel Hill, Tennessee, and moved with his family to Salem, Mississippi, in 1834. Often characterized as “Scots-Irish”, Forrest had a Norman French surname and considerable English lineage (his Mother was a...

  • Jack Hinson: One Man's Retribution

    John M Taylor|Sep 1, 2022

    The War for Southern Independence produced many divisions in both North and South. Southerners overwhelmingly supported the Confederate cause; a small percentage supported the North and some preferred to remain neutral. One individual who preferred neutrality was John W. Hinson, commonly addressed as “Jack” or “Old Jack.” Hinson owned a plantation called Bubbling Springs, near Dover in Stewart County, Tennessee. The area, known as Land Between the Lakes, separates the Cumberland and...

  • Compact is more than a Theory

    John M Taylor|Aug 1, 2022

    Recent Supreme Court rulings have stirred up a “hornet’s nest,” especially the Dobbs abortion decision on June 24, 2022. Roe vs. Wade created a so-called right to abort an unborn child, presumably traced back to Margaret Sanger--the “progressive” ultra-racist, eugenicist, authoritarian--and her ilk in Planned Parenthood. The latest ruling actually mirrors the way federalism is supposed to work, i.e., abortion is not a federal issue (enumerated in Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S....

  • The Mythical Abraham Lincoln

    John M Taylor|Jul 1, 2022

    On May 30th, the Lincoln Memorial celebrated its 100th birthday. Named after Abraham Lincoln, one memorial feature is the symbol of fasces (rods bundled together and bound with a red strap), which is also the symbol of fascism. How could there be a more accurate description of the philosophy of Abe Lincoln? Many share similar views, including author Greg L. Durand in America's Caesar: The Decline and Fall of Republican Government in the United States of America. After reading about Lincoln over...

  • Jefferson Davis: Is Government by Consent a Lost Cause?

    John M Taylor|Jun 1, 2022

    The birthday of Jefferson Finis Davis is on June 3rd. Although it is a State Holiday in Alabama there will likely be little recognition from most circles. Davis, a Jeffersonian and a Christian (Episcopalian) who served as the only President of the Confederate States of America, certainly has many detractors in modern statist America, especially the Orwellian Thought Police (largely modern Bolsheviks) who typically despise Jeffersonians, Christians, and the Confederacy--Davis managed to accomplis...

  • The Confederate Constitution: An Improved Version of the Original Compact

    John M Taylor|May 1, 2022

    Patrick Henry opposed adoption of the U.S. Constitution and warned the South about its partners, the New England “Puritans.” Realizing the antagonistic regional economic interests, Henry reasoned that once the North gained a firm majority, Southern rights would be trampled. He said: “I am sure that the dangers of this system are real, when those who have no similar interests with the people of this country are to legislate for us—when our dearest interests are to be left in the hands of...

  • Lysander Spooner: Northern Abolitionist and Supporter of Southern Independence

    John M Taylor|Apr 1, 2022

    Court historians and perpetuators of the righteous cause myth have devoted much attention to the abolitionist John Brown. Heavily financed by the Secret Six (mainly Northern Industrialists and Unitarians), Brown led a rag-tag band of murderous misfits. The first person they killed in Virginia was Heyward Shepherd, a highly respected free Black man intelligent enough to not join their gang. Brown was eventually arrested, tried, convicted, and hanged for committing treason against the...

  • Lincoln's Dilemma: Inconvenient Facts Likely to be Omitted

    John M Taylor|Mar 1, 2022

    Advertisements for “Lincoln’s Dilemma” have been aggressively promoted. It is said to begin with the January 6, 2020, event that some call a riot and some call an “insurrection”—a so-called insurrection with no weapons, individuals walking around taking pictures and chatting with Capitol personnel, and a few mysterious instigators with seemingly nefarious intentions, e.g., Utah’s John Sullivan (connected to CNN) and Ray Epps. In similar fashion, competing views of the War Between...

  • The Hampton Roads Conference

    John M Taylor|Feb 1, 2022

    Government-approved “history books” claim the War Between the States/Civil War was fought over slavery; however, the main characters in both North and South, including Jefferson Davis and Abraham Lincoln, insisted that was not the casus belli. The Hampton Roads Conference provides further insight. In early January 1865 (after over 3½ years of struggle) American journalist Francis Blair spearheaded an effort to have both sides meet face-to-face to work out a compromise. Blair was concerned...

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